Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      American Library Association, 2011.
    • Publication Date:
      2011
    • Abstract:
      Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land. By Kurt Timmermeister. Feb. 2011. 336p. Norton, $24.95 (9780393070859). 630.92. Successful baker, chef, and restaurateur Timmermeister's leap from food [...]
    • ISSN:
      0006-7385
    • Rights:
      Copyright 2011 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.
      COPYRIGHT 2011 American Library Association
    • Accession Number:
      edsbro.A249056993
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      HAGGAS, C. Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land. Booklist, [s. l.], n. 11, p. 13, 2011. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A249056993. Acesso em: 15 dez. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Haggas C. Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land. Booklist. 2011;(11):13. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A249056993. Accessed December 15, 2019.
    • APA:
      Haggas, C. (2011). Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land. Booklist, (11), 13. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A249056993
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Haggas, Carol. 2011. “Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land.” Booklist. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A249056993.
    • Harvard:
      Haggas, C. (2011) ‘Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land’, Booklist, p. 13. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A249056993 (Accessed: 15 December 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Haggas, C 2011, ‘Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land’, Booklist, no. 11, p. 13, viewed 15 December 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Haggas, Carol. “Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land.” Booklist, no. 11, 2011, p. 13. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A249056993.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Haggas, Carol. “Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land.” Booklist, 2011. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A249056993.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Haggas C. Growing a Farmer: How I Learned to Live off the Land. Booklist [Internet]. 2011 [cited 2019 Dec 15];(11):13. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A249056993

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2011 February #1

Successful baker, chef, and restaurateur Timmermeister's leap from food preparer to food producer should not have been a large one, yet the steps he took to become a working farmer were monumental. Starting with the purchase of a modest but woefully overgrown tract of land on Washington's Vashon Island, Timmermeister quickly became ensconced—some would say mired—in the vagaries of self-sufficiency. As he set out to transform his acreage into a viable farm, raising vegetables, fruit, livestock, and even bees, Timmermeister had more will than wisdom, and he recounts his failures and setbacks with disarming honesty. Yet though his hodgepodge of animals and equipment was assembled in a haphazard fashion by relying both on the kindness of strangers and the miracle of Craigslist, somehow it all works. Think of it as the Little Farm That Could. With pluck, luck, and admirable determination, Timmermeister not only manages to supply his paying customers but, more importantly, succeeds in feeding his soul. Copyright 2011 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2010 December #1

Former Seattle chef Timmermeister shares how he turned a neglected, bramble-covered property into Kurtwood Farms, a 13-acre farm specializing in cheese production and weekly farm-to-table dinners. Timmermeister begins his enterprise with little farming know-how. As he cultivates his agrarian education (often through trial and error), he reflects on self-sufficiency, sustainability, and the industrialization of food production. While narrating over two decades of the farm's history, he describes such tasks as installing bees in a new hive, making apple cider, buying livestock, and slaughtering a pig. Timmermeister also provides a helpful annotated list of supplementary titles for readers interested in the practice of sustainable local agriculture. VERDICT The growing popularity of farm-to-table movements has precipitated numerous books on city dwellers turned farmers. Part memoir, part manual, this refreshingly candid account doesn't oversell its author or a political message. An essential read for anyone who's seriously considered quitting a day job to pursue farming or cheese production.—Lisa Campbell, Univ. of Alabama Lib., Tuscaloosa

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