Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      Library Journals, LLC, 2013.
    • Publication Date:
      2013
    • Abstract:
      * Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life. Farrar. Oct. 2013. 496p. notes, bibliog. index. ISBN 9780374178482. $30. BIOG Labor (Emeritus Wilson Professor, American literature, Centenary Coll. of Louisiana) offers [...]
    • ISSN:
      0363-0277
    • Rights:
      Copyright 2013 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.
      COPYRIGHT 2013 A wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
    • Accession Number:
      edsbro.A339016190
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      BRITTON, S. Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life. Library Journal, [s. l.], n. 13, p. 94, 2013. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A339016190. Acesso em: 25 jan. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Britton S. Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life. Library Journal. 2013;(13):94. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A339016190. Accessed January 25, 2020.
    • APA:
      Britton, S. (2013). Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life. Library Journal, (13), 94. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A339016190
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Britton, Sharon. 2013. “Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life.” Library Journal. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A339016190.
    • Harvard:
      Britton, S. (2013) ‘Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life’, Library Journal, p. 94. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A339016190 (Accessed: 25 January 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Britton, S 2013, ‘Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life’, Library Journal, no. 13, p. 94, viewed 25 January 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Britton, Sharon. “Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life.” Library Journal, no. 13, 2013, p. 94. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A339016190.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Britton, Sharon. “Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life.” Library Journal, 2013. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A339016190.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Britton S. Labor, Earle. Jack London: An American Life. Library Journal [Internet]. 2013 [cited 2020 Jan 25];(13):94. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A339016190

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2013 October #1

*Starred Review* Jack London (1876–1916) improvised a fast-burning life of reckless adventure that served as the wellspring for his magnificently dramatic writings, from The Call of the Wild to Martin Eden. A good student and insatiable reader ever-grateful for the public library in Oakland, California, young London, poor and fatherless, worked demeaning jobs, then took to sea as an oyster pirate. He learned to fight and drink and became a socialist and constant wanderer. His Klondike escapades yielded a gold mine of stories and inspired his lifelong practice of writing 1,000 words a day, no matter what. London scholar Labor extracts every drop of excitement, folly, romance, creative ecstasy, grueling effort, and despair from the vast London archives, including the relentless press coverageof his exploits. What writer today could ignite the front-page frenzy that surrounded London and the love of his life, Charmian? His fearless second wife, literary accomplice, and stalwart companion on perilous South Sea journeys, Charmian kept a diary from which Labor extracts riveting disclosures leading up to her robust, sexy, carousing husband's precipitously failing health and early death. Labor's unceasingly vivid, often outright astonishing biography vibrantly chronicles London's exceptionally daring and wildly contradictory life and recovers and reassesses his complete oeuvre, including many powerful, long-neglected works of compassionate, eyewitness nonfiction. Let the Jack London revival begin. Copyright 2013 Booklist Reviews.

LJ Reviews 2013 August #1

Labor (Emeritus Wilson Professor, American literature, Centenary Coll. of Louisiana) offers a biography and researched treatise on the work, life, loves, and philosophical leanings of American author John Griffith "Jack" London (1876–1916). More than 20 biographies have been written about London, but this volume promises to be one of the best for those who have read London's books but know less about his life. As London's official biographer and curator of the Jack London Museum in Shreveport, LA, Labor had access to London's personal diaries and letters, as well as those of his wife Charmian, and knew London's daughters and others with insight into the writer's life. Labor portrays London as a complex person, at once disciplined and wild, who lived as an adventurer, "oyster pirate" (or poacher), prospector, and factory worker before establishing himself as a writer. London's humble and impoverished background led him to work in factories and take other menial jobs to help support his family. His disciplined rise to celebrated author through willpower and hard work makes this a fascinating tale of success. VERDICT Highly recommended for London fans and readers who enjoy biographies, especially those of literary figures.—Sharon Britton, Bowling Green State Univ. Lib., OH

[Page 94]. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

LJ Reviews Newsletter

American author Jack London's best story may have been the life he lived (1876–1916). Though there have been more than 20 other biographies written about London (The Call of the Wild), this rich, well-researched treatise by the writer's official biographer tells of his subject's disciplined rise from paperboy to "oyster pirate" to celebrated author; a fascinating tale of success. (LJ 8/13)—AP (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

PW Reviews 2013 June #1

This engrossing biography paints a sympathetic (though not uncritical) portrait of London's dynamic ambition and energy. Born in San Francisco in 1876 to an impoverished single mother, London (White Fang) took up factory work to support his household while still a child, and by age 18 had worked as an oyster pirate, sailor, and rail-riding hobo. Omnivorous reading and sporadic education fueled his desire to write, and a year spent surviving the Yukon Gold Rush (1897–1898) provided him with inspiration for his earliest nonfiction and fiction. As rendered by Labor (The Portable Jack London), London's official biographer and curator of the Jack London Museum in Shreveport, La., London was a complex and often contradictory individual—a writer who turned every experience into literary fodder; who disciplined himself to produce 1,000 words per day; and whose by-his-bootstraps lifestyle fueled his devotion to socialism and social justice. But London's enthusiasms also had their dark side: he was a reckless spendthrift who had to churn out mountains of copy for pay to stay ahead of his creditors; he was an incautious celebrity whose public exploits often made him tabloid fodder; and he was a free spirit who could be self-destructive at times. Here, London emerges as a rugged adventurer with a soft heart, and a larger-than-life character who might have figured as the hero in one of his own brawny bestsellers. (Oct.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC