Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      Library Journals, LLC, 2017.
    • Publication Date:
      2017
    • Abstract:
      Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America. Farrar. Apr. 2017.320p. illus. notes, index. ISBN 9780374189976. $27; ebk. ISBN 9780374712907. SOC SCI Washington, DC, public defender-turned-Yale [...]
    • ISSN:
      0363-0277
    • Rights:
      Copyright 2017 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.
      COPYRIGHT 2017 A wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
    • Accession Number:
      edsbro.A481649167
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      DAVIS, T. J. Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America. Library Journal, [s. l.], n. 3, p. 103, 2017. Disponível em: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A481649167. Acesso em: 6 dez. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Davis TJ. Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America. Library Journal. 2017;(3):103. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A481649167. Accessed December 6, 2019.
    • APA:
      Davis, T. J. (2017). Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America. Library Journal, (3), 103. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A481649167
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Davis, Thomas J. 2017. “Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America.” Library Journal. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A481649167.
    • Harvard:
      Davis, T. J. (2017) ‘Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America’, Library Journal, p. 103. Available at: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A481649167 (Accessed: 6 December 2019).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Davis, TJ 2017, ‘Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America’, Library Journal, no. 3, p. 103, viewed 6 December 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Davis, Thomas J. “Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America.” Library Journal, no. 3, 2017, p. 103. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A481649167.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Davis, Thomas J. “Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America.” Library Journal, 2017. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A481649167.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Davis TJ. Forman, James. Locking up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America. Library Journal [Internet]. 2017 [cited 2019 Dec 6];(3):103. Available from: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&scope=site&db=edsbro&AN=edsbro.A481649167

Reviews

LJ Reviews 2016 November #1

Yale Law School professor Forman argues that black America suffers from aggressive police tactics and disproportionately high rates of incarceration because the crime rate was high when African Americans first started taking office as mayors, judges, and police chiefs. Thus, they felt compelled to institute tough measures to help create stable black communities.. Copyright 2016 Library Journal.

LJ Reviews 2017 February #2

Washington, DC, public defender-turned- Yale University clinical law professor Forman traces the growth of the carceral state that now holds behind bars about one in every four adult black males. Taking a different turn from much of the literature on the topic, the author focuses on black-on-black attitudes and actions as he recollects his Washington experience. He argues that beginning in the 1970s, with a rising generation of unprecedented black political power, elected black leaders and their constituents significantly shaped U.S. criminal justice policy, invariably supporting tough on crime measures as fearful black communities sought self-protection. The result in Washington was that a majority black jurisdiction ended up incarcerating many of its own, Forman concludes. VERDICT Forman's series of brief essays deserve reading by policy-makers and practitioners in the criminal justice system, as well as by general readers. His attention to the range of black responses to crime and punishment adds to our understanding of the prison system, while not discounting the enduring role of discrimination. [See Prepub Alert, 10/10/16.]—Thomas J. Davis, Arizona State Univ., Tempe

Copyright 2017 Library Journal.

PW Reviews 2017 January #2

Drawing on a varied CV (public defender, Supreme Court clerk, charter school cofounder, Yale law professor), Forman addresses a tangled and thorny issue—the part played by African-Americans in shaping criminal justice policy. A complex picture emerges, focused on Washington, D.C., as black inner-city residents are hurt both by "over- and under-policing" and as effective enforcement and fairer treatment of minorities come to seem incompatible to policymakers. Forman delineates the ravaging effects of cures with boomerang consequences—from vigorous prosecutions of relatively minor offenses that cut offenders off from public benefits, to black anti-drug activism that enables more punitive policing, to mandatory sentencing policies that prove unequally implemented. With regard to public policy, Forman's attentiveness to class divisions in the black community (for example, the middle-class desire for increased numbers of black policemen, as opposed to the working-class goal of simply accessing new avenues of employment) offers an exemplary perspective. The book achieves genuine immediacy, due not only to the topical subject, but also to Forman's personal experiences within the legal system. Possibly controversial, undoubtedly argumentative, Forman's survey offers a refreshing breath of fresh air on the crisis in American policing. Agent: David McCormick, McCormick Literary. (Apr.)

Copyright 2017 Publisher Weekly.